What Really Happens When You Strengthen Your Core

Unless you’re an athlete, a trainer, or a medical professional, you’re probably blissfully unaware of just how important the core is. Here’s a little secret: A strong core is so much more beneficial than just helping you look better in a bathing suit.

The truth? Your core is the thing that controls absolutely every movement of your body — whether you’re trying to roll out of bed, tie your shoes, or play a few games of racquetball with your workout partner.

As the central stabilizer of your entire body frame, your core is actually comprised of more than 50 muscles from your pelvic floor to your chin. It’s what helps you move efficiently against gravity, meaning that a weak or insufficiently built core affects how your body can move your arms, your legs, even your neck. If you want your body to work at top efficiency, cranking up leg day is fine, but it’s not going to get you the results you REALLY need. To do that, you need to work on your foundational muscles first: Your core.

The even better part? A stronger core doesn’t just help you with high-level athletic performance. It affects everything from daily tasks to making you less likely to trip or fall. Here are just a few of the ways a stronger core can affect your life and increase your overall health:

1. A stronger core contributes to less back pain.

Did you know that 80% of American experience lower back pain at one time or another — and that this is costing $100 billion annually, from OTC medication to physical therapy? Many of these lower back problems can be prevented with a more resilient core, either as a preventative measure, or coupled with other treatments as problems arise.  

2. It makes extracurriculars more fun.  

Are you an avid golfer in your downtime? Love to kayak or canoe on the weekends, or even go on leisurely hikes? If you’re moving at all during your activities, you could benefit from a more powerful core. Bending, twisting, rowing, even gardening — all of those movements are powered by a strong core.   

3. It helps improve regular, everyday tasks.

Hate that when you lean over to put your shoes on in the morning you’re huffing and puffing with the exertion? A stronger core can help with that. Love to bring in 8 plastic bags of groceries at one time, cementing your role as the household supermarket hero? A stronger core can get you to 12+ bags. These tasks, plus many more, are easier and less stressful when combined with regular core exercises.

4. It gives you more stability.

The stronger your core, the easier you move through gravity — that’s the long and short of it. If you find yourself becoming particularly concerned with your balance (maybe you’re just clumsy, or maybe it’s age-related), a stronger core could be what you need to decrease your risk of losing your balance or falling.

5. It leads to better posture.

The immediate effect of better posture: You can breathe better, and also experience less fatigue and strain on your body throughout the day. The long-term effect of better posture? Confidence. Great posture not only gives you better body alignment, but it projects personal confidence and assurance, helping you communicate and build relationships with ease.

A strong core isn’t just about a 6-pack, it’s about building up the 50+ muscle framework that makes every single movement you make easier. And if you’re not training your core, you’re undermining the potential of your body to perform.

To build the most optimized training regimen, forget crunches and planks — they’re actually harming your ability to train the 50+ muscles in your core. Instead, the AllCore360° is the ultimate tool for increasing your core strength, with a no-impact, isometric, balanced and coordinated technique. Regardless of athletic ability or movement restrictions, users can train ALL of the body’s core muscles in 10 minutes, in street clothes or workout gear.

Sound too good to be true? We promise it’s not, and you can learn more about our innovative, patent-pending technology trusted by industry experts and trainers at the Shepherd Center, the University of Oklahoma, and more, here.